Chiropractor in north London, helping spines in Highgate, Hampstead, Finchley and Muswell Hill stay healthy naturally.

Posts tagged ‘flu’

Swine Flu: Is Fear Driving you to Chose the Vaccine or Logic?

An amazing chiropractor and friend, Dr. Michelle Nielsen, designed the youtube video below to help people make informed decisions about the swine flu and the vaccine. Dr. Nielsen is a pioneer in the field of natural health and is dedicated to educating all people about true health, healing and ways to manifest a better life.

I would highly recommend spending 5 minutes to review the material presented in her informative youtube video. She presents some simple facts and statistics that can help you make an informed choice for your health.

Go to http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=883lecJjBbA

The video presents the truth behind the swine flu, the statistics of past flu epidemics and the latest facts which researchers are presenting. The rush to go out and get the vaccine may be a big plan by the pharmaceutical companies to scare people into getting the swine flu vaccine.

Is the threat really that big? Past predictions about former flu epidemics were incorrect. Researchers say that the swine flu is no more dangerous than regular seasonal flu. Also, the numbers say that you are 322 times more likely to die in a car accident than by the swine flu. Do the risks of chemical laden vaccines outweigh the benefits? What are the side effects of the swine flu vaccine?

Please stay informed about this important issue. Also, do your own research, take care of your health, rest, maintain a positive mental outlook, improve your diet, and keep your spine healthy with chiropractic and stretching exercises.

Approach the swine flu with an informed and open mind. Don’t let fear drive your choices and most importantly, think of the basic and most natural ways to prevent potential health problems. You then have a greater chance of strengthening your immune system and keeping the swine flu away from you and your loved ones.

In Health,

Dr. Angela Grove

London Chiropractor EC4, City of London chiropractor, North London chiropractor, Kensal Rise chiropractor

Serving the City of London and Notting Hill and Kensal Rise areas for over 12 years. Visit your local Kensal Rise Chiropractor today!

Please contact your London Chiropractor for more information about ways to stay healthy. Our London chiropractic clinic is located at London Chiropractor, 123 Cannon Street, London EC4N 5AX, Tel: 07904911499 or visit our website www.londonchiropractor.com

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Vaccines are Ineffective – Research Study

I came upon this research study about vaccines in children. It shows them to be ineffective. Please read and stay informed!
In Health,
Dr. Angela Grove
Chiropractor
www.londonchiropractor.com

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1
Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Among Children 6 to 59 Months of Age
During 2 Influenza Seasons
Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine
October 2008;162(10):943-951
Peter G. Szilagyi, MD, MPH; Gerry Fairbrother, PhD; Marie R. Griffin, MD, MPH;
Richard W. Hornung, DrPH; Stephanie Donauer, MS; Ardythe Morrow, PhD; Mekibib
Altaye, PhD; Yuwei Zhu, MD, MS; Sandra Ambrose, MBA; Kathryn M. Edwards, MD;
Katherine A. Poehling, MD, MPH; Geraldine Lofthus, PhD; Michol Holloway, MPH;
Lyn Finelli, DrPH, MS; Marika Iwane, PhD, MPH; Mary Allen Staat, MD, MPH
FROM ABSTRACT:
Objective:
To measure vaccine effectiveness (VE) in preventing influenza-related health care
visits among children aged 6 to 59 months during 2 consecutive influenza seasons.
Design:
Case-cohort study estimating effectiveness of inactivated influenza vaccine in
preventing inpatient/ outpatient visits (emergency department [ED] and outpatient
clinic). We compared vaccination status of laboratory confirmed influenza cases
with a cluster sample of children from a random sample of practices in 3 counties
during the 2003-2004 and 2004-2005 seasons.
Setting: Counties from Rochester, Nashville, and Cincinnati.
Participants:
Children aged 6 to 59 months seen in inpatient/ED or outpatient clinic settings for
acute respiratory illnesses and community-based subcohort comparison.
Main Exposure: Influenza vaccination.
Results:
During the 2003-2004 and 2004-2005 seasons, 165 and 80 inpatient/ED and 74
and 95 outpatient influenza cases were enrolled, while more than 4500 inpatient/
ED and more than 600 outpatient subcohorts were evaluated, respectively.
Significant influenza vaccine effectiveness could not be demonstrated for any
season, age, or setting after adjusting for county, sex, insurance, chronic conditions
recommended for influenza vaccination, and timing of influenza vaccination (VE
estimates ranged from 7%-52% across settings and seasons for fully vaccinated 6-
to 59-month-olds).
Conclusion:
In 2 seasons with suboptimal antigenic match between vaccines and circulating
strains, we could not demonstrate vaccine effectiveness in preventing influenzarelated
inpatient/ED or outpatient visits in children younger than 5 years.
2
THESE AUTHORS ALSO NOTE:
“The US and several other countries have expanded their childhood influenza
vaccination recommendations in response to evidence that influenza disease causes
substantial morbidity among young children.”
In June 2006, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices
recommended annual influenza vaccination for all children aged 6 to 59 months.
“An inherent assumption of expanded vaccination recommendations is that
the vaccine is efficacious in preventing clinical influenza disease.”
“Surprisingly little information exists regarding influenza vaccine effectiveness
among young children receiving vaccine in routine health care settings.”
RESULTS
“No significant vaccine effectiveness in the outpatient setting was observed
for any age group for either season.”
“Although on bivariate analyses the subcohort had consistently higher
vaccination rates than the cases for most age strata, after adjustment for
covariates, we could not demonstrate statistically significant vaccine effectiveness
for the 6 to 23 month, 24 to 59 month, or the entire 6 to 59 month age groups in
either season.”
During the 2003-2004 season, only 11% of influenza “A” specimens across
the United States were similar to a strain included in the vaccine.
During the 2004-2005 season, only 36% of virus isolates were antigenically
similar to vaccine strains.
“It is extremely challenging to predict which influenza strains will circulate
and not possible to predict geographic variability in circulating strains.”
CONCLUSIONS
“Each year, US children aged 6 to 59 months experience high rates of
hospitalizations, ED visits, and outpatient visits due to influenza. Despite this, we
were unable across 3 large communities to demonstrate that influenza vaccination
was effective in preventing influenza-related inpatient/ED visits or outpatient visits
during 2 consecutive seasons (2003-2004 and 2004-2005) among 6- to 23-montholds,
24- to 59-month-olds, or the entire age span.”
3
KEY POINTS FROM DAN MURPHY
This study measured the effectiveness of the flu vaccine effectiveness in preventing
influenza-related health care visits among children aged 6 to 59 months during 2
consecutive influenza seasons, 2003-2004 and 2004-2005.
1) “The US and several other countries have expanded their childhood influenza
vaccination recommendations in response to evidence that influenza disease causes
substantial morbidity among young children.”
2) In June 2006, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices
recommended annual influenza vaccination for all children aged 6 to 59 months.
3) “An inherent assumption of expanded vaccination recommendations is that
the vaccine is efficacious in preventing clinical influenza disease.”
4) Significant influenza vaccine effectiveness could not be demonstrated for any
season, age, or setting after adjusting for county, sex, insurance, chronic conditions
recommended for influenza vaccination, and timing of influenza vaccination.
5) In 2 seasons with suboptimal antigenic match between vaccines and
circulating strains, we could not demonstrate vaccine effectiveness in preventing
influenza-related inpatient emergency department or outpatient visits in children
younger than 5 years.
6) “No significant vaccine effectiveness in the outpatient setting was observed
for any age group for either season.”
7) “Although on bivariate analyses the subcohort had consistently higher
vaccination rates than the cases for most age strata, after adjustment for
covariates, we could not demonstrate statistically significant vaccine effectiveness
for the 6 to 23 month, 24 to 59 month, or the entire 6 to 59 month age groups in
either season.”
8) During the 2003-2004 season, only 11% of influenza “A” specimens across
the United States were similar to a strain included in the vaccine.
9) During the 2004-2005 season, only 36% of virus isolates were antigenically
similar to vaccine strains.
10) “It is extremely challenging to predict which influenza strains will circulate
and not possible to predict geographic variability in circulating strains.”
11) “Each year, US children aged 6 to 59 months experience high rates of
hospitalizations, ED visits, and outpatient visits due to influenza. Despite this, we
were unable across 3 large communities to demonstrate that influenza vaccination
was effective in preventing influenza-related inpatient/ED visits or outpatient visits
during 2 consecutive seasons (2003-2004 and 2004-2005) among 6- to 23-montholds,
24- to 59-month-olds, or the entire age span.”